Alberta Farm Animal Care Association
The East Olds Dairy Farmers group won AFAC’s Award of Distinction for Communication and Lakeland College earned the Award of Distinction for Industry Leadership. Both Awards of Distinction are presented to individuals or groups who have made exceptional contributions to progress in farm animal care in Alberta and beyond. East Olds Dairy Farmers Group  The East Olds Dairy Farmers Group is comprised of multiple dairy producers looking to constantly better themselves and leave a mark on their
Featured speaker brings message encouragement to industry to continue to tell the good news in livestock  World renowned livestock welfare and handling expert Dr.  Temple Gradin kept the crowd at the 2018 Alberta Farm Animal Care Livestock Care Conference enthralled as she spoke about animal welfare and many issues the industry faces today. Having worked in the industry for more than 45 years, Grandin says she has much change, but one key issue remains—not enough people in the

March 15, 2018

Changing face of the swine world

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Drs. Jennifer Brown and Egan Brockhoff shared a raft of exciting findings and research related to pig health at the 2018 Alberta Farm Animal Care Livestock Care Conference in Olds, Alta., March 15, 2018. Dr.  Brown spoke candidly about how the shift towards antibiotic free systems will be important when producers are moving onto new systems compliant with changing industry standards and expectations. “We have to think about them in a different way again,” said Dr. Brown regarding

March 15, 2018

Driving innovation with poultry

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Dr. Clover Bench spoke about the history of poultry health at the Alberta Farm Animal Care Livestock Care Conference in Olds, Alta., March 15, 2018. She explained how one of the biggest shifts since the 1930s has been a move away from curiosity-based research to traditional scientific research covering a multitude of welfare areas.    With battery cages and automation on the rise since the early- to-mid-60s, the next 15 years saw a shift into investigating
When colder temperatures hit and chickens are ‘cooped’ up, they are prone to becoming bored. This can lead to behavioural issues you may not normally see in your flock such as egg eating, feather pecking, and even cannibalism in severe cases. Chickens generally do quite well in our Alberta winters, provided that the breeds you have are suitable to our climate and that they are provided a dry, draft-free, warm shelter with access to water that is
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